Munich, I Am Coming!

Munich Germany Travel

In less than twenty-four hours I’ll be on a plane for Munich. I’m excited. I’ve never been there and it kicks off a three week vacation of epic awesomeness where I’ll get to see Munich, Vienna, Prague, and Budapest and holy shit it’s awesome. And? There’s a lot to do. There’s packing, remembering underwear, and the seven-thousand creams that stop my face from falling off. Makeup, tampons, a hairbrush (which I almost always forget somehow), and my phone charger. I watch youtube videos on packing to help like this one on Packing Light For Travel (minus the taking photos of my outfits. Who has time for that shit?).

And? And I’m fucking stressed out. Excited and stressed is a weird combination.

I never used to stress about travel until I had Oliver. Oliver, you’re awesome, but you make life stressful as fuck. Thanks for that. I have to find him a sitter, make sure they understand the full extent of his insanity, prepare for every possible bad scenario, and then some which is terrible for me because I have OCD and “bad scenario,” for me is probably not bad scenario for other people who are less crazy. My brain goes worst scenario, then to a dark place that is traumatic like, “What if someone forgets to lock the back door and there is an alien invasion and the aliens exclusively eat Poodles?” My “what if’s” are terrifying and weird. So, I’ve spent all week thinking about scary things WHILE trying to learn German, and study the history of the fun places I’m going.

Speaking of German, I’m pretty much fluent at this point. And by fluent I mean I can speak two sentences that are probably all I’ll ever need if I’m trapped in the movie Legend and/or feeling confused about my vagina.

“Where are the unicorns?”

“I am a woman?”

Thank you, Duolingo, and my friend Thomas for helping me master this whole language thing. I give it two days before the staff of our hotel begin avoiding me. Oh jesus, there’s that woman that aggressively declares her gender. And? Everyone knows unicorns are SCOTTISH. Asshole. 

In preparation for my trip I’ve been reading blogs about living in Munich. I’ve found some really fun ones with some great info like wahlmuenchnerin. I have no idea what that means, actually, but she’s an American who writes about living in Munich. Pretty fun. I’ve also been slowly putting together of things to do and things to see. Anyone from Munich that has some fun tips for me? Put it in the comments below! I asked for some ideas on Facebook and you guys had awesome advice.


1. Englischer Garten with Biergarten with Chinesischem Turm and watch the surfers on Eisbach. If the weather is fine you will find a couple of nude people on the great lawn taking a sunbath.

2. Deutsches Museum

3.Augustiner Keller – original tradtional brewery with restaurant. Better skip Hofbräu Haus

4. Vktualien Markt – fantastic farmers market.

5.Marienplatz with Rathaus and close by one of Germany’s finest department stores : Ludwig Beck.

6. BMW Museum

7. Asamkirche

8. Neue und Alte Pinakothek

What would you guys add? Put it in the comments below? Any of you currently living in Munich? Share your blogs with us below! I’d love to read them! Packing tips? German phrases? Help a ME out!

20 thoughts on “Munich, I Am Coming!

  1. We had some amazing juice at Viktualienmarkt. I don’t know Munich well enough to suggest anything that’s not on your list though. Get back to me when you need tips for Salzburg or Vienna.

    • I’ve been thinking of you all week! I’ve been meaning to email you and I just keep getting sidetracked in the meantime. YES! I want all of your tips and tricks for Germany! I love your blog and I know you’ll have awesome recommendations.😉

  2. This is not gonna top your exciting list, but when I was there ten years ago for about an hour, I thought their boar sculpture looked exactly like the one in Firenze. Boh! have a great time!

  3. This may not be on your exciting list, but I was there almost 10 years ago for an hour and I believe that the bronze boar sculpture in Munich is the same one that Firenze has. Boh! Have fun… gonna be an amazing holiday!

  4. Welcome to Munich!

    Ice cream at True & 12 (lovingly made, fresh, super tasty), a beer by the river Isar, a stroll around the Glockenbachviertel… You will have a great time!

    Also, the documentary film festival DOK.fest is on…

  5. “Oh jesus, there’s that woman that aggressively declares her gender. And? Everyone knows unicorns are SCOTTISH. Asshole.” – I’m dying here – hilarious!

    For Vienna, if you like amusement parks (I’m a ride FIEND), here’s your go-to:
    And of course, I always do the cheesy but effective HOHO (hop-on-hop-off) busses for a good overview.

    Most importantly, Re: Oliver: Are you aware of It’s an amazing site, wonderfully trustworthy, and Oliver will always be in good hands. And because you are in Florence, you will get a shit-ton of applicants within milliseconds of posting your listing and your laptop will blow up. Seriously, check them out. I’m in the process of looking for a house- &/or pet-sitting gig myself, while in Italy in October/November.

    Have a blast in Munich – I look forward to hearing all about it!

  6. I suggest you take an afternoon for a trip down the Prinzregentenstrasse. You can either stroll, or catch the number 100 bus toward the Ostbahnhof, hopping on and off.

    Start at the Odeonsplatz. Seek out the subtle but chilling memorial to Shirker’s Alley, behind the Feldernhalle—the big raised stage. ( While you’re at it, rub the Lions’ noses outside the Residenz for good luck.

    Hop on the #100 toward the Ostbahnhof (careful—not toward the Hauptbahnhof) and get off at the Haus der Kunst. There, you’ll encounter the preposterous sight of the Eisbach surfers.

    Next door, the Haus der Kunst was one of the first galleries built by Hitler and cronies to house proper, conservative representational German art—the gallery now hosts travelling exhibitions which celebrate precisely the opposite. After WWII, authorities rid the city of every visible swastika; the ceiling of the portico is one of two remaining spots where they simply couldn’t easily remove them from the tiled pattern.

    Further down Prinzregentenstrasse, you’ll see an imposing structure that houses the Bavarian Ministry for Infrastructure, Technology, International Trade, Bombast, Hauteur and Self-Importance. The original HQ for the Luftwaffe, it contains the other remaining swastikas, in the iron grillework in the fence down the side street to the left.

    Hop off the bus again at the Villa Stuck. ( Franz Stuck was a professor of art in Munich in the late 1800s, who taught both Kandinsky and Klee, which earned him a knighthood (he became the freshly-minted Count von Stuck) and the hand of a rich American widow. The latter let him build the imposing villa, which is a stunning example of the Art Noveau style (“Jugendstil”) which the neighbourhood is famous for. If you don’t fancy taking in the rotating exhibitions, you can buy a cut price ticket for just the historic rooms, and it’s worth it.

    Nearby in the neighbourhood is the Friedensengel (Angel of Peace) ( ), the Russian consulate (that explains the protest display mounted by the resident of a nearby apartment building) and the Käfer food hall. The last is a must if you’re a foodie seeking a crash course in German smallgoods. Nice cafe there, too, if you’re in the mood. On the other hand, if you and your husband are jonesing for an Italian coffee, the Trogerstrasse holds a microscopic establishment called the Extrabar, run by an elderly Italian lady whose daughter and son-in-law have installed a 1950s espresso machine for her that seems to perplex her a tad. On the other side of PRstrasse, opposite the Palace hotel at Trogerstrasse 44, is a nondescript building that housed one of Munich’s few Jewish safe houses in the thirties and forties.

    Last stop is the Prinzregentenplatz. Biggest and most prominent building is the Prinzregententheater, built expressly for Wagner operas in the early 1900s. Sweet talk your way into the auditorium, conservatory and restaurant for a look. The frescoes are quite cool.

    Nearby, in the police station at number 16, is another chilling spot. On the second floor was Hitler’s private apartment from 1929 to his death in 1945. It was here that Neville Chamberlain signed the ill-fated Munich Agreement in 1938. From time to time, Hitler would use the balcony to address supporters who would gather outside.

    (It you’re interested to learn more about Munich’s sad and prominent role in the events that led up to WWII, you can drop in at the just opened NS-Dokumentationszentrum in the Königsplatz, not far from the Lenbachhaus gallery which Harvey wisely recommended. BTW, hi Harvey!)

    And on that note, it’s time to catch bus #54 toward Münchener Freiheit. It will drop you at the door of the famous Chinesischer Turm Beer Garden, where all the naked sunbathers repair after working up a thirst.

    In Munich, German skills are nice, but not necessary. Drop me a note if you find yourself in need.


  7. I completely understand your “bad scenario” brain! Worst case scenario at my apartment: someone breaks in and the dog gets loose; even worse case scenario: I forget to lock one of the three locks and suddenly the dog develops an understanding of how to unlock up to two locks before leaving me in the dust. Sigh.

    Have a lovely trip in Munich, and just yell at those bad scenario thoughts to go away!

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